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K-12 Assistant Principal
Mrs. Pam Ratliff
 
Dear Parent/Guardians;
 
Parent-teacher conference time is approaching, and many may wonder, what’s the big deal? Why are parent-teacher conferences so important? Well, a growing body of evidence suggests that family engagement MATTERS for student success.  Research shows that       family engagement improves school readiness, student achievement, and social skills.  Through this shared responsibility, schools reach out to and engage families in meaningful ways, and, similarly, families do their part to actively support their children’s learning and development.
 
Over the past several weeks, teachers have been discussing what they can do to make these conferences a comfortable, productive experience for both parents and teachers.  After all, we are all on the same team, shooting for the same goal of promoting student success…academically, socially and emotionally!
 
As a way to help parents prepare for conferences, Harvard Family Research Project offers a tip sheet for parents. An outline of the suggestions follows, but for more information, go to:
 
http://www.hfrp.org/var/hfrp/storage/fckeditor/File/Parent-Teacher-ConferenceTipSheet-100610.pdf
 
What should you expect?
 
A two-way conversation. Like all good conversations, parent-teacher conferences are best when both people talk and listen. The conference is a time for you to learn about your child’s progress in school: Ask about your child’s, grades, and test scores. Find out whether your child is meeting school expectations and academic standards. This is also a time for the teacher to learn about what your child is like at home. When you tell the teacher about your child’s skills, interests, needs, and dreams, the teacher can help your child more.
 
Emphasis on learning. Good parent-teacher conferences focus on how well the child is doing in school. They also talk about how the child can do even better. To get ready for the conversation, look at your child’s homework, tests, and notices before the conference. Be sure to bring a list of questions that you would like to ask the teacher.
 
Opportunities and Challenges - Just like you, teachers want your child to succeed. You will probably hear positive feedback about your child’s progress and areas for improvement.  Be prepared by thinking about your child’s strengths and challenges beforehand. Be ready to ask questions about ways you and the teacher can help your child with some of his or her challenges.
 
What should you talk to the teacher about?
 
Progress. Find out how your child is doing by asking questions like: Is my child performing at grade level? How is he or she doing compared to the rest of the class?  What do you see as his or her strengths? How could he or she improve?
 
Your thoughts about your child.  Be sure to share your thoughts and feelings about your child. Tell the teacher what you think your child is good at. Explain what he or she needs more help with.
 
Support learning at home.  Ask what you can do at home to help your child learn. Ask if the teacher knows of other programs or services in the community that could also help your child.
 
Support learning at school. Find out what services are available at the school to help your child. Ask how the teacher will both challenge your child and support your child when he or she needs it.
 
I look forward to seeing you at parent conferences!
 
Sincerely,
 
 
Pamela Ratliff
K-12 Assistant Principal


    
 
Contacts
+ Ratliff, Pamela
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