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K-12 Assistant Principal
Mrs. Pam Ratliff
    

Coming to your home soon…. Elementary Standards Based Report Cards
 
     Did your grandparents give you a dollar for each A on your report card? Were you ever surprised when your student scored a ‘2’ on the NYS Test in ELA when they had been getting 80’s on their report cards all year long?  For Copenhagen Central School’s elementary school students and parents, those days are gone. Elementary teachers are pairing standards-based report cards with their standards-based teaching, and parents will be getting more information about their students' achievement than ever before.
     Throughout the next few weeks (and beyond) there will be a variety of ways to become more acquainted with our new report cards.  In the meantime, let’s take a quick look at some frequently asked questions!
 
What is a standards-based report card?
     A standards-based report card lists the most important skills students should learn in each subject at a particular grade level. For example, in writing, a second-grade report card might list these skills:
 
How are standards-based report cards different from traditional report cards?
     On many traditional report cards, students received one grade for reading, one for math, one for science and so on. On a standards-based report card, each of these subject areas is divided into a list of skills and knowledge that students are responsible for learning. Students will receive a separate mark for each standard.
     The marks on a standards-based report card are different from traditional grades. In the past, grades were often calculated by combining how well the student met his particular teacher's expectations, how he performed on assignments and tests, and how much effort the teacher believes he put in. This type of grading makes it difficult for parents to pinpoint skills their children have mastered, or need improvement on and whether they are working at grade level.
 
Why switch to a standards-based report card?
     The change to a Standards-Based report card comes from the belief that our previous report card did not fully communicate what students are expected to know and be able to do a set forth in the NYS Common Core Standards. The new report cards make the standards very clear to parents and students alike, allowing them to easily determine exactly what their students are expected to do at each grade level in order to be successful.
     This new report card will benefit students, teachers and parents/guardians.  Parents and students will be more aware of skills in need of improvement, and teachers and Academic Intervention Service (AIS) providers will be able to more easily target instruction to better address these needs.
 
Why don't we see standards-based report cards in middle or high school?
     Although states have standards for middle and high school classes, there are many challenges to using a standards-based report card at these levels. According to some, one of the biggest concerns is that students need traditional grade-point averages and transcripts to be competitive in applying to college. It has also been noted that the large number of subjects students study in high school would make standards-based report cards unwieldy.
How can you learn more about our new standards based report cards?
     In the upcoming weeks, parent guides, standards based report card information nights and an online video will be provided to better inform parents and the community about our new report cards.  Keep watch on our website, Facebook page, and in your students’ book bags for more information.  And, as always, your student’s teacher is a great resource for grade level particulars!
How will standards based report cards affect my child?
   
 One of the biggest adjustments for students and parents is that many standards-based report cards focus on end-of-the-year goals.  This means that in the first or second grading period, instead of getting 4's for trying hard and doing well on tests, a high achieving student might have several marks indicating that he or she is not yet proficient in some skills.  Although this is normal since most students will not meet all of the year's goals in the first quarter, it can be disconcerting to parents and kids used to seeing all 3's and 4's. 





 
 
Contacts
+ Ratliff, Pamela
Click on name to see details.

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